What is a trough in geography?

What is a trough in geography?

A trough is an elongated area of relatively low pressure extending from the center of a region of low pressure. Air in a high pressure area compresses and warms as it descends.

What is a trough in aviation?

Troughs are elongated regions where there is low pressure, and they typically occur before a cold front. A trough is often an indicator of coming clouds, showers, or a shift in the direction of the wind. Ridges, in weather terminology, are elongated regions of relatively high pressure.

What weather do troughs bring?

A trough can bring in cloudy conditions and precipitation or they can bring in a cold air mass. A ridge is a region with relatively higher heights. A broad region of sinking air or a deep warm air mass will both lead to ridging. Since air is often sinking within a ridge they tend to bring warmer and drier weather.

What is a trough on a synoptic chart?

Troughs. A trough appears on the weather map as a dashed blue line on the chart. It is an elongated area where atmospheric pressure is low relative to its immediate surroundings.

How do you find a trough on a weather map?

Broadly speaking, troughs and ridges are properties of the pressure field and they can easily be seen on a weather map. Troughs are found near low pressure areas while ridges are found near high pressure. Below is an example of what they tend to look like.

What is a trough in the ocean?

oceanic trough, an elongate depression in the seafloor that is characteristically shallower, shorter, narrower, and topographically gentler than oceanic trenches.

What is the meaning of peaks and troughs?

Peaks and troughs are the highest and lowest concentrations of a medication in an individual’s body. They are used to determine dosing intervals, or how much time should pass between each new administration of the drug.

What is a trough bom?

A trough appears on the weather map as a dashed blue line on the chart. It is an elongated area where atmospheric pressure is low relative to its immediate surroundings. Like cold fronts, troughs separate two different air masses (usually more moist air on one side and drier air on the other).

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